Prepositional Phrases – With

–  Prepositional Phrases – With  –


An Alphabetical list of English Prepositional Phrases using the word “With”  –  If you do not see the Phrase that you are looking for, please let me know in the comments below and I will be happy to add it for you at my earliest convenience.


With


(to) Agree With – This phrasal verb is used to say that one has the same thinking and/or feelings as another person or group, pertaining to a specific thing…  “I agree with Tom on the matter about whether or not we should keep investing our time and energy in producing little white bouncing thing-a-ma-bobs.”


(to) Break Bread With (someone) – This is an ancient phrase which used to be literal, but now is used to mean:  To commune with someone or some group and to create a bond with them.  This came from the times when the most common way of eating was to pass a loaf of bread around and each person would break off a piece to dip in their soup or just eat plain.  From this act of sharing, there is a belief that when people share food with each other there is a bonding between them.  This is also why many business negotiations happen or are at least discussed over a meal.


(to) Break Off Communication With (someone) – This is a phrasal verb which is used to describe the situation wherein one party finds it necessary to completely stope (or drastically halt) communication with another party for some perceived “negative” reason…  “After it became clear that he was only interested in her for her because he had had a thing for “exotic” foreign women, she thought that it would be best to break off communication with him.”


  • (to) Come To Grips With/About – This is an Idiomatic Prepositional Verb Phrase which is used to mean:  “To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to comprehend, hard to believe, or hard accept”.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally coming to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”


(to) Cope With (something) – This is a phrasal verb which means:  To “deal” with or “handle” a situation which is stressful or just not very pleasant, and unfortunately, can not be avoided…  “Coping with the pressures of having a high work-load and not enough of a labor-force is a common problem for many business owners.”


(to be) Economical With The Truth – Since the word “Economical” often implies “saving” or not “spending” or to “not use” as much as normal, then to be “economical with the truth” describes a situation, wherein, a person or group chooses to withhold vital information that would work against them.  This phrase is used either sarcastically, or in order to claim that the person or group being economical with the truth were not actually lying.


(a) Force To Be Reckoned With – This is an idiomatic noun phrase with is used to describe a person or a thing which is very powerful and or potentially dangerous.  To “Reckon” means to come to a decision after careful calculation, so to say that, “Hillary Clinton is a force to be reckoned with” – means that: she is not only powerful, but (as her history has shown us) she is also very dangerous and will not hesitate to murder people who get in her way.


  • (to be) Frozen With Fear – This is an Idiomatic Prepositional Adjectival Phrase which describes the situation where-in a person (or animal) is so over-come by fear that they literally can not move, or at least can not react in order to help or save themselves…

“When the investors asked how we could have lost so much money on the campaign my colleagues were so *frozen with fear* that they just stood there like idiots.  Nobody wanted to explain to them that the CEO that they put in place, embezzled all the money and disappeared somewhere in Malaysia.”


(to) Get On With (one’s) Life – Similar to “To Get Over”, this phrase means:  To continue with one’s life after some traumatic or distressing event or period of time…  “Though I was greatly disappointed that I would not get to have a romantic and passionate love affair with Monica Bellucci, I realized that I must get on with my life and not spend anymore time being depressed about it.”


  • (to) Get To Grips With/About (something) – This is an Idiomatic and Prepositional Verb Phrase which is used to mean:  To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to understand, hard to believe, or hard accept.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally getting to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”


(to) Lose Touch With (someone) – This phrasal verb is used to describe when a period of time passes from the last time that one communicates with another and now, it is not certain how to actually contact the other…  “When I was in elementary school, I had a friend name Ben, who I was very close with, but after I moved away, we lost touch with each other, and now I don’t even know where he is or what he’s doing with his life.”


  • (to be) On The Same WaveLength With (someone) – Though this is an Idiomatic and Prepositional Adjectival Phrase which comes to us from the world of radio.  Radio signals travel at difference frequencies.  The word frequency is related to the signal’s “wave-length”.  If the radio receiver is not tuned to the correct frequency it will not be able to pick up the frequency of the station and thus, you will only hear static…  So to say that two people are on the same wave-length just means that they can comprehend each other and probably think and feel the same or similarly.  –  (See also:  “To Strike A Chord With & “To Resonate With)

(to) Resonate With (someone/something) – This is a term which is used to mean, to thinking, and feeling the same as another.  The word describes when one string of a violin (or any stringed instrument) is vibrating, the other strings next to it, also vibrate at the same frequency…  “I resonated well with what the speaker was saying in the presentation, and I’m looking forward to implementing some of his ideas with our own team.”  (See Also:  “(to) Strike A Chord With)


(to) Strike A Chord With (someone) – “to strike” means “to hit”, and the “chord” in this phrase refers to the string of a piano (or any stringed instrument).  When a chord is struck on a piano, it causes the string to vibrate.  This, in turn, causes the strings next to it on either side to start to vibrate or “resonate” at the same frequency.  So if something “strikes a chord” with you, it literally (proven by science) causes you to vibrate with the same frequency – causing you to feel and think the same way…  “The speakers ideas really struck a chord with me.  I haven’t been able to stop thinking about it ever since.”  –  (See Also:  “(to) Resonate With (someone)“)


(one’s time is) Taken Up With – This is an adverbial phrase which is used to describe something (usually an action) which “occupies” or “uses up” the majority of a person’s time…  “I teach English on-line, but most of my time is taken up with writing reports, rather than actually teaching any English!”


(to be) Trembling With Fear – This is a verb phrase which describes when a person is so filled with fear that they are literally trembling, shivering, or shaking…  “When the police asked to search the car, the suspect was trembling with fear.  Since it was summertime and not a cold evening, that was a clear sign to them that he was hiding something.”  –   Read The Full Post


With Plenty Of Time To Spare – This is an adverb phrase which means the same thing as in time but with a more specific meaning…  With plenty of time to spare means that (whatever) was finished/completed/etc. with a large amount of time left over before (whatever) actually needed to be done.  So… earlier than expected or hoped for.


(to) Work With (one’s) Hands – This is a phrase to mean that a person works (or is doing work) that involves physical labor as opposed to intellectual work…  “Though my father was a very intelligent man he enjoyed working with his hands.”  –  “working with your hands can often-times be much more rewarding than sitting in an office all day…  even if you do not make as much money.”


–  ( Prepositional Phrases – With )  –

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