Prepositional Phrases – To

–  Prepositional Phrases – To  –


An Alphabetical list of English Prepositional Phrases using the word “To”  –  If you do not see the Phrase that you are looking for, please let me know in the comments below and I will be happy to add it for you at my earliest convenience.


To


  • Apologize To – This phrasal verb needs to be followed by the person, group, etc. that the person is making the apology “to” – ie. who the apology is directed at…  “I have to *apologize to* my wife for not cleaning the house while she was gone.”

  • Back To Business – This interjection is commonly spoken in two types of situations –

1.  As a command to “Return To Work” (usually spoken by a boss or manager) when it has been realized that the workers are not doing their work.

“What the heck are you all doing?!  You know you’re not supposed to be using facebook on company time!  Get *back to business* and don’t let me catch you doing that again!”  –  (See Also:  “Back To Work”)

2.  Spoken by someone when it is necessary to return to the work that was being done before some distraction took one off course or after some break or rest.

“Okay, I think that what we’re talking about now, is not really relevant to the meeting.  Let’s get *back to business* and deal with the issues we’re here to talk about.”


  • Back To Work – This interjection is (usually) used as a command to “Return To Work” (usually spoken by a boss or manager) when it has been realized that the workers are not doing their work…  “What the heck are you all doing?!  You know you’re not supposed to be using facebook on company time!  Get *back to work* and don’t let me catch you doing that again!”  –  (See Also:  “Back To Business”)

  • (to) Bring (someone) Up To Date/Speed (about something) – These (date & speed) are idiomatic phrasal verbs which mean to update someone on the information, details, knowledge, etc. of some thing so that the person is “current” (up to today’s date, or up to the same speed of operation as everyone else).  This phrase is used when there has been a certain amount of change or development since the person being updated has last received any information.  (The only difference is that the “speed” version is used when the time-frame is smaller (updates are more frequent or not as far apart…  “Allow me to *bring you up to date* on all the new developments we have implemented in our core marketing strategy.”  /  “So, why don’t you *bring me up to speed* on everything that you’ve been working on.”  –  (See Also:  “(to) Keep (someone) Up To Date/Speed“)

  • (to) Come To Grips With/About – This is an idiomatic phrasal verb which is used to mean:  To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to understand, hard to believe, or hard accept.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…  “People all around the world are finally *coming to grips* with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”

  • (to be) Dead To The World – This is an idiomatic adjective phrase used to describe someone who is so incredibly tired or sleeping so heavily that one can not get his or her attention or wake that person up.  This is also a phrase to use when a person is hung-over or ill…  “After hiking 30 kilometers, then drinking 12 pints of beer and passing out in the snow for three hours, George was completely *dead to the world*.  I’m surprised he didn’t have to go to the hospital.”

  • (a) Face-To-Face (meeting/conversation/etc.) – This is an Idiomatic and Prepositional Phrasal-Adjective which is used to describe things like meetings or conversations that take place when the people are actually in the same place and talking directly to each other, rather than over a phone, tele/video-conference, or internet chat…

“Things have gotten so bad at the office in Minneapolis that I have to fly out there and have a face-to-face meeting with the management there.  They don’t actually know that I’m coming, so this should be, not only informative, but a bit entertaining as well.”  –  (See Also:  “In-Person”)


  • (to) Get To Grips With/About – This is an idiomatic phrasal verb which is used to mean:  To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to understand, hard to believe, or hard accept.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…  “People all around the world are finally *getting to grips* with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”

  • (to) Jump To Conclusions – This is an idiomatic verb phrase which means:  To make a decision about something (usually motivated by emotions) without having all of the information about the situation…  “Every time I come home late, smelling like alcohol, with blood on my shirt, and my wife always *jumps to the conclusion* that I’ve gotten into some sort of trouble.  I don’t know where she gets these silly ideas.”

  • (to) Keep (someone) Up To Date (about something) – This is an idiomatic phrasal verb which means to update someone on a continual process, rather than on just one occasion, so that the person is “current” (up to today’s date).  This phrase would be appropriate for a manager who needs to be continually updated on the progress of a certain situation…  “I need you to *keep me up to date” on the progress of the building plan.”

  • (to) Take Someone To Court – This is a phrasal verb which means to sue someone.  For this reason that person or group is forced to attend court because of you.  So it is because of you that they are “taken” to court.

  • “We’ll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It” – This Idiomatic Aphorism can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, which is used when someone is discussing or worrying about something (situation/condition/etc.) for-which nothing can be done at the moment (just like, one can not “cross a bridge” until he or she has first gotten there.)  And so – Idiomatically – talking or worrying about that “something”, in the present, is in-no-way beneficial – and, ultimately, is a complete waste of energy…

“So many people spend so much energy worrying about what we will do when the aliens finally invade, but obviously there is nothing we can do about it now…  We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.”  –   Read the Full Post Here


 

–  ( Prepositional Phrases – To )  –

 

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