Phrasal-Verbs – Letter W (With Prepositions)

–  Prepositional Phrasal-Verbs – Letter W  –


Ww


  • (to be) Born With A Silver Spoon In (one’s) Mouth – This is an IdiomaticPrepositional & Adjectival Phrasal Verb which is used to express that a person was born into a family and a life of wealth and privilege and has probably never had to work or experience any hardship in his or her life.  It is usually said as a derogatory remark against that person out of jealousy and resentment…

“Most people would agree that Gwyneth Paltrow was born with a silver spoon in her mouth, and that is why people resent almost all of the ridiculous things that she says to the media.”



  • (to) Come To Grips With/About – This is an Idiomatic and Prepositional Verb Phrase which is used to mean:  “To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to comprehend, hard to believe, or hard accept”.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally coming to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”



  • (to) Get To Grips With/About (something) – This is an Idiomatic Verb Phrase which is used to mean:  To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to understand, hard to believe, or hard accept.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally getting to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”





  • (to) Warm Up To (someone) – Since we often talk about having a “warm” feeling when we have a close connection with someone (whether it be emotional or metal) when we talk about “becoming” closer to someone, we say that we are *warming up to* them.  This same phrase can also be used (though not as common) with ideas or concepts…  “Jack and Diane really *warmed up to* each other quickly!”  –  “I think that the world is starting to *warm up to* the idea of a full-scale revolution against the empirical power structure that has kept all of us in mental slavery for the past few thousand years.”

  • Went Down – This is a phrase (usually used when talking about websites or the servers that they are hosted on) that is used to explain that something has gone wrong and it (the server, website, etc.) has stopped working temporarily…  “Our website *went down* for three hours last night.”

  • Went Off – This is a phrase that we use to mean something like “exploded”, but is also used to talk about alarms as well.  (Probably because they cause a similar reaction of surprise…  (or at least are supposed to.)…  “The Bomb *went off*, destroying everything within 30 meters.”  /  “The alarm *went off* surprising the burglar, and causing him flee the scene.”

  • Went Under – This is a phrase used to talk about a company or a business that has failed completely and gone “out of business”; a permanent failure.  The term comes from what we do to people when they die.  They “go under” the ground (and of course, death is a permanent failure of life.)…  “The company *went under* because of poor management.”

  • Went Up – This is a phrase used to talk about something being established, started, built, etc….  “The circus tents *went up* so quickly, it was amazing to think that only a couple hours before, it was just an empty field.”

  • (to) Work Out [exercise] – This is an idiomatic phrasal verb which is referring to exercise but is usually reserved specifically for aerobic exercise or what many people refer to as “cardio”; meaning that the exercise is used to raise the heart-beat in order to *work* the fat, cellulite, toxins, etc. *out* of the body.

  • (to) Work Out [situations] – This is a phrase which means that (whatever the thing is) will either work out just fine, or will get better than it currently is.  It is often said when the current situation does not appear to be good, or is very uncertain…  “Well, the organizers certainly didn’t seem to pleased about the turnout for the fundraiser, but we still have donations coming in through the website, so I’m sure that everything will *work out* in the end.”

  • (to) Work Out [problem solving] – This is a phrase which means to take some information and find some sort of a solution to a problem or situation…  “I need you to *work out* who is best suited to take the new manager’s position.”

  • (to) Work With (one’s) Hands – This is a phrase to mean that a person works (or is doing work) that involves physical labor as opposed to intellectual work…  “Though my father was a very intelligent man he enjoyed *working with his hands*.”  –  “*working with your hands* can often-times be much more rewarding than sitting in an office all day…  even if you do not make as much money.”

  • (to) Wrap (something) Up – This is an idiomatic phrasal verb which means to finish something; to do the necessary last actions of finalizing something.  The phrase comes from the fact that when we buy or make a present for someone, before we give it to him or her, we “wrap” the present in some sort of gift paper before presenting it.  Thus it is a finished product…  “So, in order to *wrap up* this description of this phrasal verb, all I have to do is give you an example sentence…  there…  done.”  😉

–  ( Phrasal-Verbs – Letter W )  –

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