Phrasal-Verbs – Letter A (With Prepositions)

–  Prepositional Phrasal-Verbs – Letter A  –


(to) Account For – This phrasal verb is used to mean: “is the reason for”, “is responsible for” and “explains” all wrapped up in the same phrase, but the significance of using this phrase is that whatever the phrase is referring to can be somehow proven with statistics (such as a percentage)…  “Human stupidity *accounts for* at least 99.9% of all the problems in the world.”


(to) Agree Upon (something) – This verb phrase is used when two or more people make a decision about something and are of the same mind about it.  Such as on a schedule or the delegation of some task…  “We all *agreed upon* the proper way of handling any future employee related issues.”


(to) Agree With (someone/something) – This phrasal verb is used to say that one has the same thinking and/or feelings as another person or group, pertaining to a specific thing…  “I *agree with* Tom on the matter about whether or not we should keep investing our time and energy in producing little white bouncing thing-a-ma-bobs.”


(to) Apologize About or Apologize For – For both of these verb phrases, they must be followed by the subject of what the person is apologizing “for” or “about”, ie. the reason the apology is necessary…  “I apologized for my behavior at the office Christmas party, but no one could seem to remember any thing I was apologizing about.”


(to) Apologize To – This phrasal verb needs to be followed by the person, group, etc. that the person is making the apology “to” – ie. who the apology is directed at…  “I have to apologize to my wife for not cleaning the house while she was gone.”


(to) Come Across – See:  Phrasal Verb – Letter “C”, for “Come”  -Or-  Prepositional Phrases – “Across”


  • (to) Come To Grips With/About – This is an Idiomatic and Prepositional Verb Phrase which is used to mean:  “To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to comprehend, hard to believe, or hard accept”.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally coming to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”


  • (to) Get To Grips With/About (something) – This is an Idiomatic Verb Phrase which is used to mean:  To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to understand, hard to believe, or hard accept.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally getting to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”


(to) Keep (one’s) Head Above Water – See:  Phrasal Verbs – Letter “K”, for “Keep”  – Or-  Prepositional Phrases – “Above”


(to) Put (something) Away – See:  Phrasal Verbs – Letter “P”, for “Put”  -Or-  Prepositional Phrases – “Away”


–  ( Phrasal-Verbs – Letter A )  –

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