Interjections

–  Interjections  –


Interjections can most simply be thought of as… statements that do not require a return statement (even thought they often get one anyways.)

Interjections are short statements to express one’s thoughts, feelings, or opinions on a matter at hand – to give some sort of prompt or advice – as a sort of proverb…  Or… They can be used as an angry statement towards someone – or as an “I-told-you-so” sort of a statement when something does not go well.

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Please note! – This list is alphabetized by either the noun or the verb that acts as the subject of the phrase rather than the preposition or the first word of the phrase.  Therefore, you will find the phrase by searching for the subject of the phrase (the noun of the verb).  This is because many phrases in the English language can have additional verbs or prepositions added to them.  If the interjection you are looking for is not here, please let me know in the comments below and I will be happy to add it.


A




  • (you better) “Get Your Act Together!” – This is something that a person would say to someone who is either behaving very poorly, doing a terrible job in his or her responsibilities, or just has a really bad attitude…

“That kid of ours must think that we’re just going to take care of him forever!  He told me that he quit his job because he doesn’t think that he should have to work; that we should just give him money!  Well, I told him that he better get his act together or we’re going to sell him to the circus!” 😀


  • I’m All About (it/that/something) – This is a slang interjection which is used to express that the person saying it, is very interested in, supportive of, or resonates with, whatever he or she is referring to…  So if you ask someone if they want to go to the beach for the day and then build a fire, drink some beer, and have a barbecue, and they say…

“Hell Yeah Buddy!  I’m all about that!

…then what they mean is:  “Why yes in-deed, my fine fellow.  I think that is a splendid idea.  Not only am I very interested in participating in this activity, but I am very pleased and excited about your proposition.  I, whole-heartedly, support your plan and will do what I can to ensure that it comes to pass, forth-with.” 😉  –  (This is typically a “young person’s” slang phrase.)


  • Lock ’em Up And Throw Away The Key – See: Letter “L” Below

B



  • Back To Business – This interjection is commonly spoken in two types of situations –

1.  As a command to “Return To Work” (usually spoken by a boss or manager) when it has been realized that the workers are not doing their work.

“What the heck are you all doing?!  You know you’re not supposed to be using facebook on company time!  Get back to business and don’t let me catch you doing that again!”  –  (See Also:  “Back To Work”)

2.  Spoken by someone when it is necessary to return to the work that was being done before some distraction took one off course or after some break or rest.

“Okay, I think that what we’re talking about now, is not really relevant to the meeting.  Let’s get back to business and deal with the issues we’re here to talk about.”

(Also Note:  The second example is the more common use of this phrase)


  • Back To The Drawing-Board – See:  Letter “D” Below

  • Back To Work!” – See:  Letter “W” Below

  • (you have to/you’ve got to) Build The House From The Ground Up” – This Idiomatic Interjection can also be turned into an  Aphorism, a Saying, and a Phrasal Verb – and is used to express the advice that:  When one is involved in some process or working on some project, that he or she needs to do things in the proper order, and start with the basic (referring to the “base” or foundation) necessities before doing other things which (though they may be more interesting) can only be beneficial after the foundational elements are firmly in place.  – Read the Full Post Here –  (See Also:  “Put The Horse In Front Of The Cart”)

  • Business As Usual” – This is a phrase that can be used in a lot of different ways, but as an interjection, it is usually said sarcastically in response to either a situation or something that someone has said, to state that one thinks that the situation or what the other person said, is “bad”, but not surprising as it seems to keep happening over and over again.  This is often used to describe politics and immoral business practices…

“Well, it seems that they are raising our taxes again, while at the same time business is down and the cost of living is getting higher…”  >  “Yeah…  Business as usual.” 😐


  • Cut The Bullshit – See: Letter “C” Below

  • “Don’t Bite Off More Than You Can Chew” – This Idiomatic Interjection can also be classified as an Aphorism, a Proverb, and a Saying – and can be turned into a Phrasal Verb which implies that…  There is only a certain amount that one person can “chew”, and if one tries to “bite off” more than he or she can “chew”, he or she will end up in a difficult situation and/or will end up wasting (whatever it is he or she is chewing)Idiomatically, it is used to give the advice that:

“One should not accept or take on more than he or she has the capacity and ability to handle at any given moment in time, or in any specific situation”…

If this advice is not heeded, the outcome may not be terrible, but it certainly will not be optimal.  –   Read the Full Post Here


  • “Don’t Hold Your Breath / “I Wouldn’t Hold My Breath (If I Were You)” – See: Letter “H” Below

  • “I Can Feel It In My Bones!” – This is a phrase which was made popular by elderly or old people who often say that they can feel when it’s going to rain, or when there will be a drastic change in the weather or seasons, because they could feel an ache or pain in their joints or “bones” (even though we don’t have nerve endings in our bones…).  Now this phrase is used to say that someone has a strong intuitive feeling about something which they may not have proof for, but which they feel strongly about.

  • “That’s A Bitter/Hard Pill To Swallow – See:  Letter “P” Below

  • “The Ball Is In Your/Their Court” – This is an idiomatic interjection which comes from the world of sports (probably tennis), and is used in situations like negotiations or any sort of situation where-in there is a sending and receiving or a “back-and-forth” of words, or actions of some sort.  It is used to mean that it is the other person’s (“Your” or “Their”) turn to say or do something…

“Well I sent in the proposal for our plan along with the revisions that they asked for, so I guess the ball is in their court now.  We’ll just have to be patient and wait for their response.”


  • “The Best Revenge Is Living Well” – See:  Letter “R” Below  –   Read Full Post Here

  • “This/That Money is Burning A Hole In My/Your/Etc. Pocket!” –  See:  Letter “M” Below

  • “We’ll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It” – This Idiomatic Interjection can also be classified as an Aphorism, a Proverb, and a Saying, which is used when someone is discussing or worrying about something (situation/condition/etc.) for-which nothing can be done at the moment (just like, one can not “cross a bridge” until he or she has first gotten there.)  And so, talking or worrying about that “something” in the present, is in-no-way beneficial – and, ultimately, is a complete waste of energy…

“So many people spend so much energy worrying about what we will do when the aliens finally invade, but obviously there is nothing we can do about it now…  We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.”  –   Read the Full Post Here


C


  • “The Ball Is In Your/Their Court –  See Letter “B” Above

  • Cry Me A River” – This phrase is used in a sarcastic way to basically tell someone who is complaining to “shut up” (another interjection) because that person is either exaggerating, or is complaining about some situation which is trivial, or would be considered something to be happy about for another person.  For example:  If I was not married, and both Monica Bellucci and the Colombian identical-twin-models, Camila and Mariana Davalos were all fighting with each other about who was going to get to spend more time with me, and I were to actually complain about it…  then any sane man would have the right and the duty to say to me…

“Oh cry me a river why don’cha!!!  I WISH I had that problem!!!”

(Note also:  ending a sentence with “why don’cha” is very much a mid-west thing…  I’m originally from Wisconsin.)


  • Cut The Bullshit” – This phrase is very similar to: “(to) cut through the bullshit” – however, whereas to cut through the bullshit is more focused on get past all the unnecessary “bullshit” – this phrase is usually used as a command and an interjection…

“Alright, cut the bullshit!!!  I’m sick of the petty arguing about things that don’t matter in the least!  Let’s focus on what is really important and actually get something done for once!”


  • Cut The Chatter – This is a phrasal verb that is often used as an interjection which means:  “stop all the unnecessary talking that is not directly related to the situation at hand at the moment”, but in actuality, it is used to mean: “Shut The Hell Up!  You Are Disrupting The (whatever)”.


  • “Every Cloud Has A Silver Lining” This Idiomatic Interjection can also be classified as an Aphorism, a Proverb, and a Saying, to express that…  every “bad” or un-pleasant situation has an aspect of something beneficial or advantageous.  This phrase is usually used to describe a situation which is happening or has already happened – or as a reminder to someone who is experiencing (or is about to experience) an un-pleasant situation – so that the person can perceive the circumstances with a more optimistic attitude.  –   Read the Full Post Here

  • “I Can Feel It In My Bones!” – See:  Letter “B” Above

  • I Didn’t Catch That” – This interjection is used to mean:  “I didn’t hear you” or “I didn’t understand you clearly”.  However, if said in a “confrontational” tone, it is sometimes used as a threat or in a way of daring the person to repeat whatever it was that he or she has just said.  In business, this can be said by the boss, when an employee says something inappropriate, not realizing that the boss heard it.  So it is said as a sarcastic warning, to indirectly tell that person that he or she had better NOT say it again or else he or she will be “in trouble”…

However, in most situations, it is simply used as an indirect way of asking the person to repeat themselves.  (Luckily it is almost always clear which meaning the person saying is using by the situation and the tone of voice.)


  • Keep Your Cool – This Interjection can also be used as an Idiomatic Phrasal-Verb, and means:  To remain calm/composed/in control – in a situation where-in the person is experiencing some aggravation/tension/stress…   –  (See Also :  (to) Lose (One’s) Cool”)

“The sign of a true statesman is to keep his cool, even when faced with absolutely terrible disgusting liars who are only concerned with their own power and not in the people that they are supposed to represent.


“to do things in the proper order”

But, this phrase is less focused on the “foundational” elements of a process, and is used more to say something like:

“Do steps 1, 2, and 3, before moving on the step 4.”

This is indicated by the fact that one must “put the horse in front of the cart” before that one can expect to get the cart moving anywhere.    (See Also“Build The House From The Ground Up”)


  • “The Ball Is In Your/Their Court –  See Letter “B” Above

  • “We’ll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It” – See:  Letter “B” Above  –   Read the Full Post Here

  • “When One Door Closes, Another Door Opens” – See: Letter “D” Below

D


  • “Back To The Drawing-Board” – This is an idiomatic interjection which probably came from the world of architecture, and was said when it was found out that some plan or design didn’t or wouldn’t work and it was necessary to go back to the planning phase and re-design everything (or a significant portion of the plan.)  Now it is usually used when something happens (usually by the fault of another or just pure circumstance) which causes a person or group to start some project all (or nearly all) over again.


  • Don’t Hold Your Breath” – See: Letter “H” Below

  • (It’s/That’s) Easier Said Than Done – See: Letter “E” Below

  • I Didn’t Catch That” – See: Letter “C” Above

  • It’s A Tough Job But Somebody’s Got To Do It – See: Letter “J” Below

  • (that’s/it’s) Not My Department – This adjectival phrase is a saying that can be used either literally or figuratively.  Literally:  It means that (whatever is being described) is not the responsibility of the person saying the phrase, because that person works within a different “department” of the company.  Figuratively:  It means that (whatever is being described) is simply not the responsibility of the person saying the phrase, or that the person really does not want to get involved in whatever it is…  “I got an email asking if I could give the customer an extra month of free hosting, but I explained that that is not my department, as I am in tech-support.”  –  “My wife told me that we needed to buy new curtains but that is definitely not my department!”

  • That Should Do the Trick – See: Letter “T” Below

  • “That Was Money Down The Drain!” – See: Letter “M” Below

  • “When One Door Closes, Another Door Opens” – This Idiomatic Aphorism is Prepositional and can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, and implies that…  when one opportunity or situation (“door”) ends or is no longer available (“closes”) – then there is, almost always, another situation or opportunity (“door”) which is, or soon becomes, available (“opens”).  As an Interjection, this phrase is used in order to “cheer up” someone who is upset about the loss of some opportunity.

E


  • (It’s/That’s) Easier Said Than Done” – This is an interjection which is commonly said about some piece of advice which sounds very simple or easy to do, but when it comes to implementing that advice, it proves to be far more difficult that is sounds…

“Many people say that when you are on a date with a pretty girl, that you should just relax and be yourself, but that’s definitely a lot easier said than done!  Especially when the girl just happens to be Monica Bellucci!”



  • Take It Easy!” – This is an interjection which is used to mean:  “Calm Down!” – and is used either when a person is becoming or already is very angry, upset, or agitated – or when a person is being or acting overly excited and anxious about something.

F


  • (you have to/you’ve got to) “Build The House From The Ground Up” – See:  Letter “B” Above   Read the Full Post Here

  • Failing To Prepare Is Preparing To Fail.” – This Interjection can also be classified as an Aphorism , a Proverb, and a Saying – and can be used as both advice and/or as a warning (as most aphorisms are) – by saying that if one “fails” to “prepare” for something (in other words, if does NOT prepare), then there is a very good chance that “failure” is exactly what the person will achieve…  Thus the action of NOT preparing actually IS preparing…  “to fail”.

  • “I Can Feel It In My Bones!” – See:  Letter “B” Above

  • I Will Never Forget It – This is an Adjectival Interjection which is used to express – about something which was spoken about – to say that it was such a memorable event of experience, that one will (as the phrase clearly states) “will never forget it”.

  • “I’m Fed Up!” – This is an Idiomatic Interjection which can also be transformed into a Prepositional Adjectival Phrase – used to say that one has had too much of a certain un-desirable situation and will no longer tolerate it (although this is still usually ab bit of an exaggeration.)  “Fed” is the past tense of “feed”.  If someone feeds a person to the point that that person’s stomach is “filled up” then there is no more room for anymore…  In addition, when a person’s stomach is completely filled (or over-filled) then it becomes hard to breath and that person is very un-comfortable.  This can cause the person to be very upset.  similarly, when a person is fed up with something, they are usually not very happy about it.

  • (You’ve Got To/ You Have To) “Put The Horse In Front Of The Cart – See:  Letter “C” Above  -Or-  Letter “H” Below

G



  • (you have to/you’ve got to) “Build The House From The Ground Up” – See:  Letter “B” Above   Read the Full Post Here

  • (you better) Get Your Act Together!” – See: Letter “A” Above

  • It’s A Tough Job But Somebody’s Got To Do It – See: Letter “J” Below

H


  • “Act In Haste, Repent At Leisure” – This Interjection can also be classified as an Aphorism, a Proverb, or a Saying, which is used to mean that:  if one does something quickly and without caring about the quality or outcome (to act in haste), then he or she will feel very bad or entirely un-satisfied about it later (repent in leisure) and will most likely have to do “it” over.  –  (See Also:  Haste Makes Waste)  –   Read the Full Post Here

  • (you have to/you’ve got to) “Build The House From The Ground Up” – See:  Letter “B” Above  – Read the Full Post Here

  • “Don’t Hold Your Breath” / “I Wouldn’t Hold My Breath (If I Were You)” – Both of these phrases are virtually the same.  They are statements used in response to someone’s statement of expectation or hope about receiving or achieving some “thing” that the other person thinks is either not very likely or is just very un-realistic.  The difference in usage is that the first is more of a statement to express one’s thoughts that the thing is ridiculous, where-as the second is used as advice…

“The boss said that he would give me a raise once we start getting a little more business.”  >  “Yeah… don’t hold your breath on that one.”  –  (“that one” is referring to that “statement” or that expectation)

“I think that, maybe, if we do really well this holiday season – we might actually get bonuses this year!”  >  “Well, I wouldn’t hold my breath.  The administration says has absolutely no incentive to do-so as they know that there are more people looking for jobs than there are jobs available.”  –  (Notice also that the “if I were you” part of the last phrase is not necessary, and the phrase means the same things without it.)


  • Haste Makes Waste” – This is an Interjection which can also be classified as an Aphorism, a Proverb, and a Saying and it used to express that:  If one does something quickly (in “Haste”), and without caring how well he or she does it (usually because he or she don’t enjoy doing it, or just wants to finish as quickly as possible), then that person will usually end-up with an un-satisfactory result or, will have to re-do “it”…  This ultimately means that one will have “wasted” even more time and energy (by having to do it again), than if that person would have “taken his or her time” to do it correctly the first time.  –  (In trying to find a video about saying, I came across This One, which has a HORRIBLE description of the phrase!  First of all, because it is not an Idiom at all!  It means exactly what it says.  BUT, because the speaker goes SO fast that it is almost impossible to understand anything of what he is saying it is actually a perfect EXAMPLE of the phrase rather than a description of it.  The speaker was acting in such “Haste”, that the video was almost completely…  “A Waste” 😀  –  (See Also:  “Act In Haste, Repent At Leisure” Above)

  • “My Hands Are Tied” – This is a common idiomatic interjection to say that some decision is beyond your control.  That the decision has been made by someone with more authority than you (in that particular situation) and that you do not have the control to change it.  However, this is often used when the person just doesn’t want to discuss it anymore, and the other party won’t take no for an answer, so by “passing the buck” to someone else they are able to then end the conversation.

  • “My Head Is Spinning!” – This is an idiomatic expression used to say one of two things.
    • 1.  One is:  amazed; overwhelmed; confused; flabbergasted – The differences in the synonyms are because this phrase can be used for both “good” and “bad” situations.
    • 2.  One is drunk; stoned; tripping; high; feeling weird; dizzy; generally intoxicated or with altered consciousness…

“I was so amazed at the amount of mistakes made by the people who created the lesson (who are supposed to be English Language Professionals) that my head was spinning.  In fact I just couldn’t take it, so I drank two bottles of wine and half of a bottle of cough syrup, and now, once again (and for completely different reasons)my head is spinning.” 😀


“to do things in the proper order”

But, this phrase is less focused on the “foundational” elements of a process, and is used more to say something like:

“Do steps 1, 2, and 3, before moving on the step 4.”

This is indicated by the fact that one must “put the horse in front of the cart” before that one can expect to get the cart moving anywhere.    (See Also“Build The House From The Ground Up”)


  • Same Here – See: Letter “S” Below

  • “Strike While (the) Iron Is HotSee: Letter “S” Below

  • “That’s A Bitter/Hard Pill To Swallow – See:  Letter “P” Below

  • “This/That Money is Burning A Hole In My/Your/Etc. Pocket!” –  See:  Letter “M” Below

I


  • I’m All About (it/that/something) – See: Letter “A” Above

  • I Didn’t Catch That” – See: Letter “C” Above

  • I Wouldn’t Hold My Breath (If I Were You)” – See: Letter “H” Above

  • I Will Never Forget It – See:  Letter “F” Above

  • It’s A Tough Job But Somebody’s Got To Do It – See: Letter “J” Below

  • “Strike While (the) Iron Is Hot”See: Letter “S” Below

  • Take It Easy!” – See: Letter “E” Above

J


  • “It’s A Tough Job But Somebody’s Got To Do It” – This interjection is used to describe something (job, task, etc.) that is not very pleasant to do and is usually said after someone either compliments someone on a job well done, or after exclaiming how terrible it would be to have to do that job.  It can also be used sarcastically when someone is referring to a job that would be absolutely awesome (like getting paid to travel the world and stay in the best hotels and eat the best food.)  –   Click Her For An Example

K


  • Keep Your Cool – See Letter “C” Above

  • Lock ’em Up And Throw Away The Key – See: Letter “L” Below

L


  • “A Little Bit (of something) Goes A Long Way – This Interjection can also be classified as an Aphorism, and a Saying, and is used to mean that “something” (friendliness/respect/courtesy/LSD) 😀 demonstrated or given to another will yield great results/benefit/usefulness/etc. in comparison to what is “invested” (or ingested) ;)…  For example:  If a person wants to gain favor with another person, it has often been demonstrated that, “a little bit of” courtesy and respect “will go a long way” towards making that person demonstrate the same in return.  And, as far as some “thing”…  if one was at a party, and was passed a joint (only in countries where that sort of thing is legal, of course) 😉 and the person passing it said,

“Be careful.  “A little bit goes a long way”

…Then it could be interpreted as meaning that the contents of the joint were very powerful and it would not take very much to produce the desired or expected result.  –  (Notice also that when it is understood what the “thing” is, it is not necessary to say the name of the “thing”.)  –   Read the Full Post Here

(Notice also that “Little Bit” and “Long Way” are noun phrases)




  • Lock ’em Up And Throw Away The Key” – This interjection is usually used as a way of expressing someone’s attitude and/or opinion about another who has committed a crime or done something considered “wrong” or “bad” by the person who is making the interjection.  It essentially means:  “Lock” the person in prison, and make sure that the person is never released.  (Back in “the old days” the jail cells were opened with keys rather than electrical systems, and if there was no key [assumingly] they would have to stay there forever.)

  • “The Best Revenge Is Living Well” – See:  Letter “R” Below  –   Read Full Post Here

  • Use It Or Lose It!”See: Letter “U” Below

M


  • All Things In Moderation – This Interjection can also be classified as an Aphorism, a Proverb, or a Saying, which is used as advice to imply that:  One should never over-do anything.  That those things which are not considered “bad”, when over-done, can become harmful, and that even those things which are often considered “bad” for us, aren’t so “bad” in moderate quantities…   Read Full Post Here

  • Cry Me A River” – See: Letter “C” Above


  • Haste Makes Waste” –  See: Letters “H” Above or “W” Below

  • My Hands Are Tied” – See: Letter “H” Above

  • My Head Is Spinning!” – See: Letter “H” Above

  • Practice Makes Perfect – See: Letter “P” Below

  • (that’s/it’s) Not My Department – See: Letter “D” Above

  • “That Was Money Down The Drain!” – This is an idiomatic expression which is used to say that something was a complete waste of money, and is used to describe the thing that the money was spent on, not the money itself.  As one can not (figuratively speaking) get the water back once it has gone down the drain, so too is the money spent on something which was a “piece of sh!t” or a service of “sh!tty quality”, for-which a person can no-longer get his or her money refunded…

“I know that people think that Las Vegas is supposed to be a marvelous place to spend the weekend, but I just wasted 6 months of my salary on crappy food, stupid slot-machines, and I think that I might have gotten married to a stripper last night.  That was definitely money down the drain!”


  • “This/That Money is Burning A Hole In My/Your/Etc. Pocket!” – This is an idiomatic expression which is used to say, either about one’s self or to another person that either you or the other person has a terrible temptation to spend some money and may need to calm down so that the money doesn’t “disappear” (get spent so quickly).  This usually happens when someone has a much larger amount of available money than normal, like on vacation, or when the money is un-expectedly received.

N


  • I Will Never Forget It – See:  Letter “F” Above

  • (that’s/it’s) Not My Department – See: Letter “D” Above

O



  • Same Old ‘Same Old’…” – See: Letter “S” Below

  • “When One Door Closes, Another Door Opens – See: Letter “D” Above

P


  • “Failing To Prepare Is Preparing To Fail.” – This Interjection can also be classified as an Aphorism , a Proverb, and a Saying – and can be used as both advice and/or as a warning (as most aphorisms are) – by saying that if one “fails” to “prepare” for something (in other words, if does NOT prepare), then there is a very good chance that “failure” is exactly what the person will achieve…  Thus the action of NOT preparing actually IS preparing…  “to fail”.

  • Practice Makes Perfect – This common Aphorism can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying.  It is very often used as an Interjection when someone makes a mistake or does something “imperfectly”, and is said as a remind that person should not to be concerned about it; that he or she only needs to “practice” more and then “perfection” can/may be obtained.

  • (You’ve Got To/ You Have To) Put The Horse In Front Of The Cart” – See:  Letter “C”  -Or-  Letter “H” Above

  • “That’s A Bitter/Hard Pill To Swallow” – This is an idiomatic interjection used to comment on something which is not very pleasant but must be or was endured regardless of the wishes of the person who experienced it.  More specifically it is usually referring to things which represented some very difficult news or information to receive and often represents a tragic moment in a person’s life or a very difficult (but usually important) lesson that one has or needs to learn.

  • “The People Have Spoken” – This interjection is used to say that a group or the majority of some group (“the people”) have shown/demonstrated/expressed their thoughts/feelings/opinion about some subject/matter either through some sort of vote or simply by their actions.

  • “There’s No Time Like The Present – See: Letter “T” Below

  • “This/That Money is Burning A Hole In My/Your/Etc. Pocket!” –  See:  Letter “M” Above

Q


R



  • Cry Me A River – See: Letter “C” Above

  • “The Best Revenge Is Living Well” – This is an Interjection that can also be classified as an Aphorism, a Saying, and a Proverb which is used to express that one should not think about getting “revenge” against someone, but instead to “live well”  –  To find out more, read the whole blog post…   Read Full Post Here

S


  • (It’s/That’s) Easier Said Than Done – See: Letter “E” Above


  • It’s A Tough Job But Somebody’s Got To Do It – See: Letter “J” Above

  • My Head Is Spinning!” – See: Letter “H” Above

  • Same Here” – This interjection is something that one would say to agree with someone who is expressing a thought, feeling, emotion, etc….

“I think that ‘The Mad Hatter’ is one of the most genius of all fictional characters ever created!.” > “Same here!”

“I think that people who refer to themselves as ‘Social Justice Warriors’ are actually sociopathic and socially pathetic losers.”  >  “Same here!”


  • Same Old ‘Same Old’…” – This is a phrase that is used to answer a question like:  “How are things?” / “What’s New?” / “What’s Up?” / etc..  It is used to mean that the same things happen all the time and never change, so that concept becomes the subject of the “Same Old” stuff.  So when we double that phrase, it means that it’s the same old stuff, not only day-after-day- but also week-after-week, month-after-month, etc..  Grammatically, the first “Same old…” in the sentence is an adjectival phrase to describe the second “same old” in the sentence which functions as a noun-phrase.

  • Same To You” – This interjection is something that a person would say when that person wishes to express the same as what has just been said to them…

“Have An Excellent Day!” 🙂 > “Same to you!” 😀

“Go to hell, you lousy bastard!!!” 🙁 > “Same To You!!!” 🙁


  • Shape Up or Ship Out”  This an interjection that is used as a rebuke to someone whose behavior or actions have not been good or has been view as unacceptable.  It means:  to improve one’s behavior or sometimes attitude (“Shape Up”) – and that if the behavior or attitude in not changed then the person is fired, in trouble, or needs to leave (“…or Ship Out”)

“Take an opportunity while it is still available.”

…Because often-times, when people hesitate, the opportunity can be missed.  This phrase comes from the art of black-smithing (iron-working).  When the metal is red-hot then it is soft and easy to work with.  Once the metal cools, it hardens and is much more difficult to work with.  The word “strike” is verb which means:  To hit/pound/kick/etc..  So Idiomatically, if one “Strikes While The Iron Is Hot” then it will be much easier to take that opportunity…  but if one waits, the opportunity will be gone – just like the possibility to shape cold metal.  –  (Note Also: that the article “the” is not necessary, but is grammatically more proper.)


  • “That’s A Bitter/Hard Pill To Swallow – See:  Letter “P” Above

  • That Should Do the Trick – See: Letter “T” Below

  • “The People Have Spoken – See: Letter “P” Above

T



  • (you better) “Get Your Act Together!” – See: Letter “A” Above

  • I Didn’t Catch That – See: Letter “C” Above

  • Lock ’em Up And Throw Away The Key – See: Letter “L” Above

  • It’s A Tough Job But Somebody’s Got To Do It – See: Letter “J” Above

  • “It’s (right) On The Tip Of My Tongue – This interjection is what a person says when they are trying to remember some word or name and it seems like he or she can almost say it but for some reason the word seems “stuck”; as if it is “on the tip of” the person’s “tongue” but does not want to leave his or her mouth.

  • My Hands Are Tied – See: Letter “H” Above

  • Same To You” – See: Letter “S” Above

  • Take It Easy!” – See: Letter “E” Above

  • That Should Do the Trick – This interjection is used to mean:  “That should work; fix the problem; solve the dilemma, etc.”

  • That Was Money Down The Drain!” – See: Letter “M” Above

  • “There’s No Time Like The Present” – This very common interjection is used as a way of saying:  “Let’s do it now!” – It is often used in situations when people have just finished (or are just finishing) discussing some thing which needs to be done.  So to say…

“Well, there’s no time like the present!”

…is usually done as a way of motivating action.


U


  • (you have to/you’ve got to) “Build The House From The Ground Up – See:  Letter “B” Above  –   Read the Full Post Here

  • Business As Usual – See: Letter “B” Above

  • Lock ’em Up And Throw Away The Key – See: Letter “L” Above

  • Use It Or Lose It!” – This interjection can be used in a great many different contexts.  It probably comes from the idea that if one does not exercise, he or she will lose muscle strength & control – that if one doesn’t use his or her brain, then that person’s mind may become dull – that if one doesn’t practice some “thing” then the ability will fade…  However, this phrase is now often used to imply that if one does not take some opportunity, then that opportunity will slip away, pass, or no longer be available.

V


W



  • “Back To Work!” – This interjection is (usually) used as a command to “Return To Work” (usually spoken by a boss or manager) when it has been realized that the workers are not doing their work…

“What the heck are you all doing?!  You know you’re not supposed to be using facebook on company time!  Get back to work and don’t let me catch you doing that again!”  –  (See Also:  “Back To Business”)


  • “Haste Makes Waste – This is an Interjection which can also be classified as an Aphorism, a Proverb, and a Saying and it used to express that:  If one does something quickly (in “Haste”), and without caring how well he or she does it (usually because he or she don’t enjoy doing it, or just wants to finish as quickly as possible), then that person will usually end-up with an un-satisfactory result or, will have to re-do “it”…  This ultimately means that one will have “wasted” even more time and energy (by having to do it again), than if that person would have “taken his or her time” to do it correctly the first time.  –  (In trying to find a video about saying, I came across This One, which has a HORRIBLE description of the phrase!  First of all, because it is not an Idiom at all!  It means exactly what it says.  BUT, because the speaker goes SO fast that it is almost impossible to understand anything of what he is saying it is actually a perfect EXAMPLE of the phrase rather than a description of it.  The speaker was acting in such “Haste”, that the video was almost completely…  “A Waste” 😀  –  (See Also:  “Act In Haste, Repent At Leisure” Above)

  • I Will Never Forget It – See:  Letter “F” Above

  • “I Wouldn’t Hold My Breath (If I Were You)” – See: Letter “H” Above

  • “Strike While (the) Iron Is Hot”See: Letter “S” Above

  • “The Best Revenge Is Living Well – See:  Letter “R” Above  –   Read Full Post Here

  • “We’ll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It” – See:  Letter “B” Above  –   Read Full Post Here

  • When One Door Closes, Another Door Opens” – See: Letter “D” Above

X


Y



  • “Don’t Hold Your Breath” / “I Wouldn’t Hold My Breath (If I Were You)” – See: Letter “H” Above

  • (you better) “Get Your Act Together!” – See: Letter “A” Above

  • Same To You – See: Letter “S” Above

Z


 

–  (Interjections)  –

6 Responses

  1. May 7, 2016

    […] “I agree.” as a two-word sentence which stands on its own, is also classified as an Interjection.  The person does not need to say “I agree with you” because the person being spoken […]

  2. May 7, 2016

    […] “I agree.” as a two-word sentence which stands on its own, is also classified as an Interjection.  The person does not need to say “I agree with you” because the person being spoken […]

  3. May 12, 2016

    […] is an Idiomatic Aphorism which can also be classified as a Saying, and can be used as an Interjection (as in the heading above) – and is used to say […]

  4. May 13, 2016

    […] Aphorism, Interjection, Proverb & Saying – “All Things In Moderation”, is used to imply that doing […]

  5. May 24, 2016

    […] (“door”) which is, or soon becomes, available (“opens”).  It can also be used as an an Interjection, when someone is disappointed about some lost opportunity or when something does not go […]

  6. July 22, 2016

    […] (“door”) which is, or soon becomes, available (“opens”).  It can also be used as an an Interjection, when someone is disappointed about some lost opportunity or when something does not go […]

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