Aphorisms – Letter H

–  Aphorisms – Letter H  –


An alphabetically arranged collection of common and not-so-common Aphorisms in English.  Many Aphorisms (commonly referred to as known as “Sayings”) have slightly different forms and interpretations, depending on region, back-ground, and who is saying them, the ones here are listed in the most commonly used forms or where added by request.

Enjoy!


Hh


  • “Act In Haste, Repent At Leisure” – This Aphorism can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, or a Saying, which is used to mean that:  if one does something quickly and without caring about the quality or outcome (to act in haste), then he or she will feel very bad or entirely un-satisfied about it later (repent in leisure) and will most likely have to do “it” over.  –  (See Also:  Haste Makes Waste) –  Read the Full Post Here

  • “Every Cloud Has A Silver Lining” This Idiomatic Aphorism can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, to express that…  every “bad” or un-pleasant situation has an aspect of something beneficial or advantageous.  This phrase is usually used to describe a situation which is happening or has already happened – or as a reminder to someone who is experiencing (or is about to experience) an un-pleasant situation – so that the person can perceive the circumstances with a more optimistic attitude.  –   Read the Full Post Here

  • “Build The House From The Ground Up” – This Idiomatic Aphorism can also be classified as a Saying, and can be turned into an Interjection and a Phrasal Verb – and is used to express the advice that:  When one is involved in some process or working on some project, that he or she needs to do things in the proper order, and start with the basic (referring to the “base” or foundation) necessities before doing other things which (though they may be more interesting) can only be beneficial after the foundational elements are firmly in place.  – Read the Full Post Here –  (See Also:  “Put The Horse In Front Of The Cart”)

  • Haste Makes Waste” – This is an Aphorism which can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying and it used to express that:  If one does something quickly (in “Haste”), and without caring how well he or she does it (usually because he or she don’t enjoy doing it, or just wants to finish as quickly as possible), then that person will usually end-up with an un-satisfactory result or, will have to re-do “it”…  This ultimately means that one will have “wasted” even more time and energy (by having to do it again), than if that person would have “taken his or her time” to do it correctly the first time.  –  (In trying to find a video about saying, I came across This One, which has a HORRIBLE description of the phrase!  First of all, because it is not an Idiom at all!  It means exactly what it says.  BUT, because the speaker goes SO fast that it is almost impossible to understand anything of what he is saying it is actually a perfect EXAMPLE of the phrase rather than a description of it.  The speaker was acting in such “Haste”, that the video was almost completely…  “A Waste” 😀  –  (See Also:  “Act In Haste, Repent At Leisure” Above)

“to do things in the proper order”

But, this phrase is less focused on the “foundational” elements of a process, and is used more to say something like:

“Do steps 1, 2, and 3, before moving on the step 4.”

This is indicated by the fact that one must “put the horse in front of the cart” before that one can expect to get the cart moving anywhere.

 –   Read The Full Post Here

(See Also“Build The House From The Ground Up”)


“Take an opportunity while it is still available.”

…Because often-times, when people hesitate, the opportunity can be missed.  This phrase comes from the art of black-smithing (iron-working).  When the metal is red-hot then it is soft and easy to work with.  Once the metal cools, it hardens and is much more difficult to work with.  The word “strike” is verb which means:  To hit/pound/kick/etc..  So Idiomatically, if one “Strikes While The Iron Is Hot” then it will be much easier to take that opportunity…  but if one waits, the opportunity will be gone – just like the possibility to shape cold metal.  –  (Note Also: that the article “the” is not necessary, but is grammatically more proper.)


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