Aphorisms – Letter C

–  Aphorisms – Letter C  –


An alphabetically arranged collection of common and not-so-common Aphorisms in English.  Many Aphorisms (commonly referred to as known as “Sayings”) have slightly different forms and interpretations, depending on region, back-ground, and who is saying them, the ones here are listed in the most commonly used forms or where added by request.

Enjoy!


Cc


  • “Don’t Bite Off More Than You Can Chew – This Idiomatic Aphorism can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying – and can be turned into a Phrasal Verb which implies that…  There is only a certain amount that one person can “chew”, and if one tries to “bite off” more than he or she can “chew”, he or she will end up in a difficult situation and/or will end up wasting (whatever it is he or she is chewing)Idiomatically, it is used to give the advice that:

“One should not accept or take on more than he or she has the capacity and ability to handle at any given moment in time, or in any specific situation”…

If this advice is not heeded, the outcome may not be terrible, but it certainly will not be optimal.  –   Read The Full Post Here


  • “Every Cloud Has A Silver Lining” This Idiomatic Aphorism can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, to express that…  every “bad” or un-pleasant situation has an aspect of something beneficial or advantageous.  This phrase is usually used to describe a situation which is happening or has already happened – or as a reminder to someone who is experiencing (or is about to experience) an un-pleasant situation – so that the person can perceive the circumstances with a more optimistic attitude.  –   Read The Full Post Here

“to do things in the proper order”

But, this phrase is less focused on the “foundational” elements of a process, and is used more to say something like:

“Do steps 1, 2, and 3, before moving on the step 4.”

This is indicated by the fact that one must “put the horse in front of the cart” before that one can expect to get the cart moving anywhere. –   Read The Full Post Here

(See Also“Build The House From The Ground Up”)


  • “When One Door Closes, Another Door Opens” – This Idiomatic Aphorism is Prepositional and can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, and implies that…  when one opportunity or situation (“door”) ends or is no longer available (“closes”) – then there is, almost always, another situation or opportunity (“door”) which is, or soon becomes, available (“opens”).  As an Interjection, this phrase is used in order to “cheer up” someone who is upset about the loss of some opportunity.  –   Read The Full Post Here

  • “We’ll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It” – This Idiomatic Aphorism is Prepositional and can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, which is used when someone is discussing or worrying about something (situation/condition/etc.) for-which nothing can be done at the moment (just like, one can not “cross a bridge” until he or she has first gotten there.)  And so – Idiomatically –  talking or worrying about that “something” in the present, is in-no-way beneficial – and, ultimately, is a complete waste of energy…

“So many people spend so much energy worrying about what we will do when the aliens finally invade, but obviously there is nothing we can do about it now…  We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.”  –   Read the Full Post Here


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