Idioms – Letter W

–  Idioms – Letter W  –


Ww


1.  In a situation, where-in, a person is having trouble finding the correct words to express what he or she wants to say.

“I have done the presentation a hundred times before but for some reason, today, I was at a total loss for words.”

2.  In a situation where-in a person does not even know how to react (and usually there is another person or group is expecting some sort of response.)

“When the police presented the evidence against him, and it was clear that his story was a lie – suddenly the criminal was at a complete loss for words

(Notice also that the phrase is separable)


  • (to be) Beyond (one’s) Wildest Dreams – This is an Idiomatic and Prepositional Adjectival Phrase which expresses that the outcome of a certain situation far exceeds the expectations of that situation.  It implies that the outcome came or has come as a huge surprise because of how wonderful it was or is to the person or people experiencing it…

“I knew that seeing Pearl Jam live in concert in 1992 was going to be awesome, but I didn’t know that it was going to be such a life-changing moment.  It was beyond my wildest dreams.”


  • (to be) Born With A Silver Spoon In (one’s) Mouth – This is an IdiomaticPrepositional & Adjectival Phrasal Verb which is used to express that a person was born into a family and a life of wealth and privilege and has probably never had to work or experience any hardship in his or her life.  It is usually said as a derogatory remark against that person out of jealousy and resentment…

“Most people would agree that Gwyneth Paltrow was born with a silver spoon in her mouth, and that is why people resent almost all of the ridiculous things that she says to the media.”


  • (to) Come To Grips With/About – This is an Idiomatic Prepositional Verb Phrase which is used to mean:  “To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to comprehend, hard to believe, or hard accept”.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally coming to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”


  • (to be) Dead To The World – This is an Idiomatic Adjective Phrase used to describe someone who is so incredibly tired or sleeping so heavily that one can not get his or her attention or wake that person up.  This is also a phrase to use when a person is hung-over or ill…

“After hiking 30 kilometers, then drinking 12 pints of beer and passing out in the snow for three hours, George was completely dead to the world.  I’m surprised he didn’t have to go to the hospital.”


  • (to be) Fed Up (with someone/something) – This is an idiomatic adjectival phrase used to say that one has had too much of a certain undesirable situation and will no longer tolerate it (although this is still usually ab bit of an exaggeration.)  “Fed” is the past tense of “feed”.  If someone feeds a person to the point that that person’s stomach is “filled up” then there is no more room for anymore…  In addition, when a person’s stomach is completely filled (or over-filled) then it becomes hard to breath and that person is very uncomfortable.  This can cause the person to be very upset.  similarly, when a person is fed up with something, they are usually not very happy about it.

  • (to be) Frozen With Fear – This is an Idiomatic Prepositional Adjectival Phrase which describes the situation where-in a person (or animal) is so over-come by fear that they literally can not move, or at least can not react in order to help or save themselves…

“When the investors asked how we could have lost so much money on the campaign my colleagues were so *frozen with fear* that they just stood there like idiots.  Nobody wanted to explain to them that the CEO that they put in place, embezzled all the money and disappeared somewhere in Malaysia.”


  • (to) Get To Grips With/About (something) – This is an Idiomatic Verb Phrase which is used to mean:  To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to understand, hard to believe, or hard accept.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally getting to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”


  • (to be) Like Oil and Water – This is an idiomatic adjectival phrase, which (similar to it’s British Cousin Like Chalk and Cheese) is used to describe two things which don’t go together – however, in it’s usage, it seems to be a bit more severe than “Like Chalk and Cheese”, which can also be for something which is simply a strange combination.  This phrase, however, is used primarily to describe things which REALLY do not go well together…

“Putting Claude and Matt in the same band together was a really bad idea.  Those two are like oil and water, and it’s pretty obvious when they get on stage that they despise each other.”


  • (to be) On The Same WaveLength With (someone) – Though this is an Idiomatic and Prepositional Adjectival Phrase which comes to us from the world of radio.  Radio signals travel at difference frequencies.  The word frequency is related to the signal’s “wave-length”.  If the radio receiver is not tuned to the correct frequency it will not be able to pick up the frequency of the station and thus, you will only hear static…  So to say that two people are on the same wave-length just means that they can comprehend each other and probably think and feel the same or similarly.  –  (See also:  “To Strike A Chord With & “To Resonate With)

“Take an opportunity while it is still available.”

…Because often-times, when people hesitate, the opportunity can be missed.  This phrase comes from the art of black-smithing (iron-working).  When the metal is red-hot then it is soft and easy to work with.  Once the metal cools, it hardens and is much more difficult to work with.  The word “strike” is verb which means:  To hit/pound/kick/etc..  So Idiomatically, if one “Strikes While The Iron Is Hot” then it will be much easier to take that opportunity…  but if one waits, the opportunity will be gone – just like the possibility to shape cold metal.  –  (Note Also: that the article “the” is not necessary, but is grammatically more proper.)


  • (to be) Under The Weather – This is an Idiomatic Prepositional Adjectival Phrase used to describe when a person is not feeling very well, but is not necessarily sick from any virus or bacterial infection.  The phrase comes from the fact that many people feel this way when there is a drastic change in the weather – such as when the seasons change.  However, this phrase is often used by people as reason for not wanting to go to work

  • We’ll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It” This Idiomatic Aphorism is Prepositional and can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, which is used when someone is discussing or worrying about something (situation/condition/etc.) for-which nothing can be done at the moment (just like, one can not “cross a bridge” until he or she has first gotten there.)  And so, talking or worrying about that “something” in the present, is in-no-way beneficial – and, ultimately, is a complete waste of energy…

“So many people spend so much energy worrying about what we will do when the aliens finally invade, but obviously there is nothing we can do about it now…  We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.”  –   Read the Full Post Here


  • When One Door Closes, Another Door Opens” – This Idiomatic Aphorism is Prepositional and can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, and implies that…  when one opportunity or situation (“door”) ends or is no longer available (“closes”) – then there is, almost always, another situation or opportunity (“door”) which is, or soon becomes, available (“opens”).  As an Interjection, this phrase is used in order to “cheer up” someone who is upset about the loss of some opportunity.

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