Idioms – Letter T

–  Idioms – Letter T  –


Tt


  • A (Real) Blast From The Past – This is an Adjectival, Metaphorical, Idiomatic and Prepositional Phrasal-Noun which is used to describe something which was a part of, or represents a memory (fond or otherwise) from the past.  This phrase is used when the thing which is it describing has not been thought about for a very long time, has probably been forgotten, and the arrival of which came as a big surprise.

“Seeing my some of my old friends from Grateful Dead Tour was a real blast from the past.  I completely forgot about the week that we travelled together through the redwood forests of Northern California…  (but understandably-so).” 😉

(Just Notice that the word “Real” is often used with this phrase, but is not necessary.  Also that:  “The Past” represents a noun-phrase)


  • (to be) A Cut Above The Rest – this is an Idiomatic, Adjectival and Prepositional Phrasal-Noun which is used to express that:  Someone or something is significantly better than “the rest”.  The noun “cut” could be referring to a “cut” of meat, or it could be referring to the “cut” of a fine suit.  This phrase is an “old” one (meaning that it is older than me) 😀 and – as such – the origin is not clear.  However, the use is clear…

GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! is clearly unique among the English language websites.  In fact the others don’t even compare.  You could say that  GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! is a cut above the rest.” 😉

(Also Note that “The Rest” is a Noun Phrase, and has nothing to do with the normal usage of the word “Rest”)


  • (to be) Dead To The World – This is an Idiomatic Adjective Phrase used to describe someone who is so incredibly tired or sleeping so heavily that one can not get his or her attention or wake that person up.  This is also a phrase to use when a person is hung-over or ill…

“After hiking 30 kilometers, then drinking 12 pints of beer and passing out in the snow for three hours, George was completely dead to the world.  I’m surprised he didn’t have to go to the hospital.”


  • (to) Lose (One’s) Train Of Thought – This is an Idiomatic Phrasal Verb which is used to describe when someone is speaking – but while endeavoring to make his or her point – he or she seems to forget, momentarily, what it was that he or she was trying to express.  The reason we say “Train of Thought” is because a “train” is made up of many different cars that are all linked together.  Similarly, when one is expressing something which is more complex than a few simple sentences, many ideas flow from one to another and are all linked in order to make one point.  Just like a “train” is made up of many separate cars, all linked together to make the one long “train”.

  • (a) Thing of The Past – This is an Idiomatic Phrasal Noun which is used to describe some “thing” [either a Concrete or Abstract Noun] which was common at some point in the past but no longer is.  This phrase is also used to imply that the “thing” referred to is no longer relevant due to being “a thing of the past”

“Not being able to use calculators in school is a thing of the past.  Now it is normal to do-so.”

“Despite what most modern so-called ‘feminists’ say, Female In-Equality and ‘The Patriarchy’ are a thing of the past.  But they don’t want equality, they want to establish ‘The Matriarchy’.”

(Notice also that “The Past” is a Noun Phrase by itself)


  • “Don’t Bite Off More Than You Can Chew” – This Idiomatic Aphorism can also be classified as an Interjection, a Proverb, and a Saying, and implies that…  There is only a certain amount that one person can “chew”, and if one tries to “bite off” more than he or she can “chew”, he or she will end up in a difficult situation and/or will end up wasting (whatever it is he or she is chewing)  –  Idiomatically, it is used to give the advice that:

One should not accept or take on more than he or she has the capacity and ability to handle at any given moment in time, or in any specific situation“…  If this advice is not heeded, the outcome may not be terrible, but it certainly will not be optimal.  –   Read the Full Post Here


  • (to) Come To Grips With/About – This is an idiomatic phrasal verb which is used to mean:  To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to understand, hard to believe, or hard accept.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally coming to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”


  • (a) Face-To-Face (meeting/conversation/etc.) – This is an idiomatic adjectival phrase which is used to describe things like meetings or conversations that take place when the people are actually in the same place and talking directly to each other, rather than over a phone, tele/video-conference, or internet chat…

“Things have gotten so bad at the office in Minneapolis that I have to fly out there and have a face-to-face meeting with the management there.  They don’t actually know that I’m coming, so this should be, not only informative, but a bit entertaining as well.”  –  (See Also:  “In-Person”)


  • (to) Get To Grips With/About (something) – This is an idiomatic phrasal verb which is used to mean:  To understand, comprehend, and finally accept some some information, which is either hard to understand, hard to believe, or hard accept.  The phrase means the same thing with either the preposition “with” or “about”, but it is more common to use “with”…

“People all around the world are finally getting to grips with the fact that their governments do not, have not, and will not ever give a shit about them; and that voting for new leaders is a waste of time.  They will never stop being slave-masters to the mass of sheep which they see the people as.”


  • (to be) Neither Here Nor There – This an Idiomatic Adjectival and Adverbial Phrase which is used when a person is speaking but makes reference to something which is not necessarily realted to the main point that the person is making – and it used as a way of getting back to the main point by saying:

“What I just said is not completely relevant to what I am endeavoring to express so I will get back to my main point.”

For example:  If a person where making some point about a lesson that he or she learned from his or her grandparent, but then while trying to make a point got sidetracked and started talking about the beautiful garden at the grandparents’ house (which had nothing to do with the main point) – he or she could then stop and say…

“…and it was such a lovely garden.  But that is neither here nor there.  The important thing that I learned was…”


  • (to) Pick Up The Slack – This is an Idiomatic Verb Phrase which means to do the work of another person strictly because that work is not being done, it is important, and the other person is being a “Slacker” or that he or she is at least “Slacking Off” in this situation.

(Note Also that, “The Slack” is a Phrasal-Noun)


  • (to) Stick Together“Stick” (as a verb) means “to adhere”; bind, to something – like a piece of tape is used to “stick” things together.  So this idiomatic phrasal verb uses the slang verb “stick”  to refer to situations where-in people or groups need to:  cooperate; work together; support each other; etc.  It is often used to talk about family, friends, co-workers & lovers…

“In tough times such as these, when the world is run by criminals – family and friends really need to stick together and help each other out, if they want to survive and thrive.”


  • (to) Tear It Up – Literally, this expression would probably be used to tear a piece of paper into many pieces.  However, as an prepositional idiomatic phrasal verb, it is used to mean:  To do something REALLY REALLY well.  This is a slang phrase which is popular in the world of music, and extreme sports…

“Though Daniel Radcliffe is known for his role as Harry Potter, he can actually tear it up as a rapper too!

“Tony Hawk is such an incredible skateboarder, that he still tears it up even though he is well into his fourties.


  • (to) Tell On (someone) – This is an Idiomatic and Prepositional Phrasal Verb which is chiefly used by children to describe when one tells a parent of person of “authority” about some wrong-doing of another.  Since other children (and even many adults/authority figures) don’t really like or respect people that do this, children have come up with a slang term for these people:  (a) Tattle-Tale” and the act of telling on someone is also called “Tattling”.

  • (to) Tick All The Boxes –This is an Idiomatic Adjectival Verb Phrase.  Though the word “tick” is a verb, this is not describing an action.  Instead it is using the idea of an action to describe the thing.  “Ticking Boxes” is something that is done in a check-list to ensure that something meets all requirements or is up to specification…  So to say that something “Ticks All The Boxes” means that whatever is being described has all of the things necessary to fulfill certain requirements.  –  (See Also: “(to) Hit/Punch/Push All the Right Buttons“)

  • (to be) Under The Weather – This is an Idiomatic Prepositional Adjectival Phrase used to describe when a person is not feeling very well, but is not necessarily sick from any virus or bacterial infection.  The phrase comes from the fact that many people feel this way when there is a drastic change in the weather – such as when the seasons change.  However, this phrase is often used by people as reason for not wanting to go to work

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