Idioms

–  Idioms & Idiomatic Phrases  –


So, What The Hell are “Idioms” Anyway?  Are they: Phrasal Verbs”, “Slang Terms”, “Prepositional Phrases”, or all of the above?  Well, all of those examples could be “Idioms”, but not all of them actually are “Idioms”…  At least not in every situation.

Allow Me To Explain…


Simply put, an idiom is:

“A combination of words which, when put together, mean something different than the literal definition of the words by themselves.”


For Example:


“Get Stoned”
(phrasal verb)

“Get Crazy”
(slang term)

“Get Away With Murder”
(Idiomatic & Literally Phrasal Verb)

(don’t forget to click the links above…  they will help explain the phrases) 😉


These terms do not mean the same thing as the words literally imply…  (accept in the case of Hillary Clinton…  She actually IS a fʌkɪŋ Muderer!!!…  even if she herself didn’t literally pull the trigger.  Furthermore, she has been – and probably will continue to – “get away with it”…  I hope that I am proven wrong…  seriously, I do.)


But, getting back to my point…

Because these phrases do not mean the same thing as the combined equivalent of the definition of each individual word…  then these phrases are – by definition – “Idiomatic”…  Not merely…  “Idioms”.


This is because they also fit into other lexical classifications.  And, therefore…  wait for it…


There is NO SUCH THING as an “Idiom”!!!

Head Explosion - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!
(at least, not in the sense that it is ONLY an “idiom”, and nothing else.)


And There-In Lies The Problem…

Don’t worry…  take a deep breath…  I have a solution.  Un-like those of the human race, I will not present a problem to you, unless I first have a solution…  I promise.

😉


Since an idiom will ALWAYS fit into any or many other lexical classifications, it is my personal, professional, and meta-physical opinion that regarding “Idioms” as a separate lexical “thing” is both a mistake, and one of the biggest problems faced by learners of English.

This is because the people who are supposed to be making it easier for you all to be learning English are actually (often-times) confusing the situation by trying to teach “Idioms” as a separate “thing” – instead of teaching everyone that ALL terms and phrases in the English language can be either “Idiomatic”…  or not.


Idioms are not a separate Lexical item…  and therefore they are a ‘Non-Thing’


Instead of “Idioms” being somehow separate from “Phrasal Nouns”“Phrasal Verbs”, “Prepositional Phrases”, and “Adjectival” & “Adverbial Phrases” we (as instructors) and you (as learners) should – instead – change the word “Idiom” into an adjective to describe the phrase.

This is because (just to “drive the point home”a common idiomatic phrasal verb)  – there is NOT a single Idiom, in existence, which is not ALSO a Noun, Verb, Adjective, Adverb, or Prepositional Phrase


Oh My Gosh!!!  Enlightenment!!!

Enlightenment - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

😀


Therefore, for all (so-called) “Idioms” listed on this website it will also be indicated which other type of lexical classification it fits into.  And, likewise, if you go to the pages for any other type of phrase, saying, aphorism, etc. – you will see that, for each entry, it will also be listed whether it is “Idiomatic” or not…


Wow!  That actually kinda makes sense!


(But don’t believe me, do your own fact-finding…)


Click the Letter below to find the particular idiom you are looking for, or use the search box above…  if you are not sure whether the phrase you are looking for is an idiom or not…  don’t worry, I will let you know

😉

Enjoy!


 

A .

B .

C .

D .

E .

F .

G . 

H .

I .

J .

K .

L .

M . 

N .

O .

P .

Q .

R .

S .

T .

U .

V .

W .

X .

Y .

Z .


– ( Idioms ) –

26 Responses

  1. May 9, 2016

    […] being a slang term, this phrase is also an Idiomatic Phrasal […]

  2. May 9, 2016

    […] (Idiomatic Phrasal Noun & Slang Term) […]

  3. May 10, 2016

    […] “Tid-Bit” is an Idiomatic Aphorism which can also be classified as a Saying, and can be used as an Interjection (as in the […]

  4. May 11, 2016

    […] “Tid-Bit” is an Idiomatic Aphorism which can also be classified as a Saying, and can be used as an Interjection (as in the […]

  5. May 19, 2016

    […] Phrasal Verb can be both idiomatic or literal, and I am hereby declaring it both a Lexical lesson, AND […]

  6. May 24, 2016

    […] Tid-Bit is an Idiomatic Aphorism, which is also Prepositional and can be further classified as a Proverb, and a Saying, […]

  7. May 28, 2016

    […] “Tid-Bit” is an Idiomatic Adjectival Verb-Phrase (I bet you didn’t know there was such a thing…) which comes […]

  8. May 28, 2016

    […] “Tid-Bit” is an Idiomatic Adjectival Verb-Phrase (I bet you didn’t know there was such a thing…) which comes […]

  9. May 28, 2016

    […] “Tid-Bit” is an Idiomatic Adjectival Verb-Phrase (I bet you didn’t know there was such a […]

  10. July 4, 2016

    […] (Idiomatic Verb Phrase) […]

  11. July 13, 2016

    […] (Idiomatic Phrasal-Verb) […]

  12. July 13, 2016

    […] (Idiomatic Prepositional Phrasal-Verb & Phrasal-Noun) […]

  13. July 13, 2016

    […] as with almost all aphorisms, this phrase is almost always used idiomatically, as mentioned above, to give the advice […]

  14. July 14, 2016

    […] (Idiomatic Phrasal-Adjective) […]

  15. July 22, 2016

    […] Tid-Bit is an Idiomatic Aphorism, which is also Prepositional and can be further classified as a Proverb, and a Saying, […]

  16. July 25, 2016

    […] (Idiomatic Prepositional Phrasal-Verb & Phrasal-Noun) […]

  17. July 28, 2016

    […] is an Idiomatic Verb Phrase which comes from the world of the performing arts:  Ballet, Theatre, Comedy, etc.. […]

  18. July 30, 2016

    […] of the  cutest little Judo Stars in The World – to demonstrate the meaning of this common Idiomatic […]

  19. August 2, 2016

    […] the  cutest little Judo Stars in The World – to demonstrate the meaning of this common Idiomatic […]

  20. August 4, 2016

    […] “Tid-Bit” is an Idiomatic Adjectival Verb-Phrase (I bet you didn’t know there was such a thing…) which comes […]

  21. August 10, 2016

    […] (Idiomatic Prepositional Phrasal-Verb & Phrasal-Noun) […]

  22. August 12, 2016

    […] is an Idiomatic Verb Phrase which comes from the world of the performing arts:  Ballet, Theatre, Comedy, etc.. […]

  23. September 15, 2016

    […] Idioms” – Idiomatic Phrases Using The Word, […]

  24. October 13, 2016

    […] Idioms – Idiomatic Phrases Uses The Word, […]

  25. November 10, 2016

    […] Idioms” – Idiomatic Phrases Using The Word, […]

  26. December 8, 2016

    […] Idioms” – Idiomatic Phrases Using The Word, […]

What's On Your Mind

Yo!